Why?


Very thought provoking! A young man was Loved by his father. He was slight in build he was sent to the pasture to tend sheep. His siblings were hefty in build.

A simple story? Who would not love a cute kid and send him off to a safer pasttime?

https://biblehub.com/library/marshall/the_wonder_book_of_bible_stories/the_story_of_david_the.htm

The amazing thing is that tending the sheep; he had ‘extra’ time on his hands and learned to play instruments.

Up amongst the hills, perched like the nest of a bird on one of the long low ridges, lies the little town of Bethlehem. It was but a small town at the time this story begins, and there was nothing about it to make it at all famous. It lay out of the beaten track, and any one wanting to visit it must needs climb the long winding road that led from the plain beneath, through olive groves and sheepfields, up to the city gate — a steep, difficult road, leading nowhere but to the little town itself.


David the Shepherd Boy — Amy Steedman

Up amongst the hills, perched like the nest of a bird on one of the long low ridges, lies the little town of Bethlehem. It was but a small town at the time this story begins, and there was nothing about it to make it at all famous. It lay out of the beaten track, and any one wanting to visit it must needs climb the long winding road that led from the plain beneath, through olive groves and sheepfields, up to the city gate — a steep, difficult road, leading nowhere but to the little town itself.
[Illustration]
It was in these fields on the slope of the hills that David, the shepherd boy of Bethlehem, spent his days watching his father’s flocks. That father, whose name was Jesse, was one of the chief men of the town, and David was the youngest of all his sons.
There were seven big brothers at home, and it was no wonder Jesse was proud of his sons. They were tall, splendid young men, all of them doing men’s work now, and taking very little notice of the youngest, who was still only a small boy, chiefly useful in looking after the sheep.
But though David was but little thought of, no one could say that he did not do his work well. There was not a more careful or watchful shepherd on all the hills around Bethlehem. He knew each one of his sheep, and never allowed one to stray. He always led them to the best pasture, and found the coolest and freshest water for them to drink. Then, too, he was as brave as a lion, and if any wild beast came lurking round hoping to snatch a lamb away, David was up at once and would attack the fiercest beast single-handed. Nothing could ever do any harm to his flock.
Now it happened that one day while David was, as usual, out in the fields that a sudden stir of excitement awoke in the little town of Bethlehem. Men gathered round the city gate, and with anxious, fearful eyes looked down the long white road that led up from the plain below. And yet there seemed nothing there to make them look so terrified and anxious. Only an old feeble man was slowly climbing up towards the town. He was driving a heifer before him, and carrying what looked like a horn in his hand.
[Illustration: An old feeble man was slowly climbing up towards the town.]
But the people whispered together that the old man was none other than Samuel, the prophet of the Lord, who carried God’s messages. He must be bringing a message to them, and who knew if it was good or evil. They tried with uneasy minds to remember if they had been doing anything wrong of late as they watched the old man drawing nearer and nearer. Then at last the chief men of the town went out to meet him.
“Comest thou peaceably?” they asked anxiously.
The old man lifted his head and looked at them kindly as he echoed their words.
“Peaceably,” he answered at once; “I am come to sacrifice unto the Lord.”
A great sigh of relief went up from the people. The visit was a mark of God’s favour and not of His displeasure.
It was true, indeed, that Samuel had come to offer sacrifice, but he had come also on a secret errand about which no man knew but himself. God had bidden him take his horn of oil and anoint one of the sons of Jesse to be king over His people instead of Saul, the present king, who had displeased Him. But it was to be done secretly. Saul must not hear of it, or his vengeance would be swift.
It was in Jesse’s house that the feast of the sacrifice was prepared, and Samuel ordered that all the sons of the house should pass before him as they went to attend the sacrifice.
The first to come was Eliab, Jesse’s eldest son, and when Samuel saw him he felt sure that this was the man who was to be anointed king. He was a splendid young man, tall and strong and handsome, looking almost as kingly as Saul himself.
“Surely this is he,” murmured Samuel to himself. But God’s answer came quickly. No, this was not the man. Samuel saw only the outward signs of strength and beauty, but God saw deeper into the heart.
So the eldest son passed on, and one by one the six brothers followed, all sons that a father might well be proud of. But God sent no sign to show that any of them was the chosen king.
[Illustration: “Surely this is he,” murmured Samuel to himself.]
Samuel was puzzled. What could it mean? Then he turned again to Jesse.
“Are here all thy children?” he asked.
Surprised at the question, Jesse suddenly remembered the little lad, his youngest son, who was out in the fields tending the sheep. Was it possible that Samuel had any use for him?
“Send and fetch him,” ordered Samuel instantly, “for we will not sit down till he comes hither.”
So a messenger was sent in haste to bring David; and presently he came hurrying in, and as soon as Samuel saw him he knew his search was ended.
He was only a little shepherd lad with the breath of the hills about him, his golden hair tossed by the wind, his fair face flushed, and his sunburned hand holding his shepherd’s crook. But there was no doubt that God had chosen him.
“Arise and anoint him, for this is he,” said God’s voice in Samuel’s heart.
Slowly, then, the old man rose and held the oil aloft and poured it upon the boy’s bowed head, while the rest of the company looked silently on.
They were puzzled to know what it all meant. Perhaps the elder brothers were envious, and wondered why this mere child should be singled out for special favour. But no one dared to question God’s messenger.
Nothing further happened just then. Samuel returned as he had come by the winding white road, and before long his visit was forgotten as the people settled to their work again.

Bible > Library

The Story of David


David the Shepherd Boy — Amy Steedman

Up amongst the hills, perched like the nest of a bird on one of the long low ridges, lies the little town of Bethlehem. It was but a small town at the time this story begins, and there was nothing about it to make it at all famous. It lay out of the beaten track, and any one wanting to visit it must needs climb the long winding road that led from the plain beneath, through olive groves and sheepfields, up to the city gate — a steep, difficult road, leading nowhere but to the little town itself.
[Illustration]
It was in these fields on the slope of the hills that David, the shepherd boy of Bethlehem, spent his days watching his father’s flocks. That father, whose name was Jesse, was one of the chief men of the town, and David was the youngest of all his sons.
There were seven big brothers at home, and it was no wonder Jesse was proud of his sons. They were tall, splendid young men, all of them doing men’s work now, and taking very little notice of the youngest, who was still only a small boy, chiefly useful in looking after the sheep.
But though David was but little thought of, no one could say that he did not do his work well. There was not a more careful or watchful shepherd on all the hills around Bethlehem. He knew each one of his sheep, and never allowed one to stray. He always led them to the best pasture, and found the coolest and freshest water for them to drink. Then, too, he was as brave as a lion, and if any wild beast came lurking round hoping to snatch a lamb away, David was up at once and would attack the fiercest beast single-handed. Nothing could ever do any harm to his flock.
Now it happened that one day while David was, as usual, out in the fields that a sudden stir of excitement awoke in the little town of Bethlehem. Men gathered round the city gate, and with anxious, fearful eyes looked down the long white road that led up from the plain below. And yet there seemed nothing there to make them look so terrified and anxious. Only an old feeble man was slowly climbing up towards the town. He was driving a heifer before him, and carrying what looked like a horn in his hand.
[Illustration: An old feeble man was slowly climbing up towards the town.]
But the people whispered together that the old man was none other than Samuel, the prophet of the Lord, who carried God’s messages. He must be bringing a message to them, and who knew if it was good or evil. They tried with uneasy minds to remember if they had been doing anything wrong of late as they watched the old man drawing nearer and nearer. Then at last the chief men of the town went out to meet him.
“Comest thou peaceably?” they asked anxiously.
The old man lifted his head and looked at them kindly as he echoed their words.
“Peaceably,” he answered at once; “I am come to sacrifice unto the Lord.”
A great sigh of relief went up from the people. The visit was a mark of God’s favour and not of His displeasure.
It was true, indeed, that Samuel had come to offer sacrifice, but he had come also on a secret errand about which no man knew but himself. God had bidden him take his horn of oil and anoint one of the sons of Jesse to be king over His people instead of Saul, the present king, who had displeased Him. But it was to be done secretly. Saul must not hear of it, or his vengeance would be swift.
It was in Jesse’s house that the feast of the sacrifice was prepared, and Samuel ordered that all the sons of the house should pass before him as they went to attend the sacrifice.
The first to come was Eliab, Jesse’s eldest son, and when Samuel saw him he felt sure that this was the man who was to be anointed king. He was a splendid young man, tall and strong and handsome, looking almost as kingly as Saul himself.
“Surely this is he,” murmured Samuel to himself. But God’s answer came quickly. No, this was not the man. Samuel saw only the outward signs of strength and beauty, but God saw deeper into the heart.
So the eldest son passed on, and one by one the six brothers followed, all sons that a father might well be proud of. But God sent no sign to show that any of them was the chosen king.
[Illustration: “Surely this is he,” murmured Samuel to himself.]
Samuel was puzzled. What could it mean? Then he turned again to Jesse.
“Are here all thy children?” he asked.
Surprised at the question, Jesse suddenly remembered the little lad, his youngest son, who was out in the fields tending the sheep. Was it possible that Samuel had any use for him?
“Send and fetch him,” ordered Samuel instantly, “for we will not sit down till he comes hither.”
So a messenger was sent in haste to bring David; and presently he came hurrying in, and as soon as Samuel saw him he knew his search was ended.
He was only a little shepherd lad with the breath of the hills about him, his golden hair tossed by the wind, his fair face flushed, and his sunburned hand holding his shepherd’s crook. But there was no doubt that God had chosen him.
“Arise and anoint him, for this is he,” said God’s voice in Samuel’s heart.
Slowly, then, the old man rose and held the oil aloft and poured it upon the boy’s bowed head, while the rest of the company looked silently on.
They were puzzled to know what it all meant. Perhaps the elder brothers were envious, and wondered why this mere child should be singled out for special favour. But no one dared to question God’s messenger.
Nothing further happened just then. Samuel returned as he had come by the winding white road, and before long his visit was forgotten as the people settled to their work again.
[Illustration: Saul tries to kill David]
Only David, out in the fields, thought more and more about what had happened, and grew more and more certain that it had been a call from God to do some special work for Him. The wonder of it filled his mind, but it never interfered with his work.
There was little time for idle dreaming in the boy’s life. He was as watchful as ever in his care for his sheep and as courageous as ever in guarding them from prowling beasts. Even in his leisure time he was busy too, and there was not one of the sunny hours of daylight that he wasted.
He loved music, and he taught himself to play on the harp, practising so carefully and patiently that his fingers grew most wonderfully skilful. Then he made songs to go to the music, some of the most beautiful songs that ever have been made in all the world. Almost every child to-day knows his beautiful song about the Good Shepherd: “The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.”
There was another thing, too, that he learned to do with the same care and patient perseverance, and that was to use his shepherd’s sling. There was no boy in all Bethlehem who could shoot as straight as he could. He never missed his mark.
It was no great thing, perhaps, to make music and aim straight, but it was a great thing to do what lay nearest his hand with all his might. Perhaps some day God would make use of his singing or have some work for a boy who had a quick eye and a sure aim. Who could tell?
So David learned to do his very best, and before very long God’s call came to him.

How do we spend our time? Busy! Yes. But doing what? David the slightest of his brothers was out tending sheep as we read above and was ‘taught’ all he would need. Are you recieving instruction? Are you listening? Paying attention? Many times there are things that throw us off!

One thing amazes me in The Word of God! Ecclesiastes 3:1-15
Everything that happens in this world happens at the time God chooses. He sets the time for birth and the time for death, the time for planting and the time for pulling up, the time for killing and the time for healing, the time for tearing down and the time for building. He sets the time for sorrow and the time for joy, the time for mourning and the time for dancing,  the time for making love and the time for not making love, the time for kissing and the time for not kissing. He sets the time for finding and the time for losing, the time for saving and the time for throwing away, the time for tearing and the time for mending, the time for silence and the time for talk.  He sets the time for love and the time for hate, the time for war and the time for peace. What do we gain from all our work? I know the heavy burdens that God has laid on us.  He has set the right time for everything. He has given us a desire to know the future, but never gives us the satisfaction of fully understanding what he does.  So I realized that all we can do is be happy and do the best we can while we are still alive. All of us should eat and drink and enjoy what we have worked for. It is God’s gift. I know that everything God does will last forever. You can’t add anything to it or take anything away from it. And one thing God does is to make us stand in awe of him.  Whatever happens or can happen has already happened before. God makes the same thing happen again and again.

It does not end there!
What is YOUR purpose? A complex question! So WHY are you? Just why? Anyone else could be living your life! 🤔 BUT, you have been through the experiences that NOBODY else will ever have! Even if another ‘person’ had your life. Would they make the same mistakes? Take your path? Have THE SAME successes and disappointments as you?
If there is someone positive in their life. How did they meet them? At times we may look back with regret! I say simply, look FORWARD with thanksgiving! You are here! Still here for a reason! What is it?

We started speaking about David. Let us go on… The instruments he learned to play in his pastime. What use was it to learn? We read and learn His fingers became adept! He was a fast ‘slinger’. Wolves would come to prey on his flock, he would rise up and ‘save’ the sheep.
https://www.christiantoday.com/article/what-can-we-learn-from-davids-encounter-with-the-bear-and-the-lion/128423.htm

We ponder and are in amazement of the use of time! Mind you, your experience is NOT new! In a world of billions of people prefaced by trillions before.  There is but ONE source of ALL. Yes! We can get lost in the Science of it all. What “Creator”?

I could waste time writing “summaries” but rather Google search “God as the force Who created ALL.”
https://www.icr.org/article/why-did-god-create-us

https://www.theologyofwork.org/old-testament/genesis-1-11-and-work/god-creates-the-world-genesis-11-23

http://littlebookbiganswers.com
So often we read of God as a “Man”! If you think of it. In no way, shape and or form does he have ANY physical attributes – NONE! His Essence passed Moses by! Moses was placed in the cleft of a rock so he would not be “no more.”

So, what does all this teach us? Or should I ask “Are you learning?” I am not ignorant to not know that some are wondering “point?”

Let me first share with those who HAVE lost something or had something taken away. The devil comes only to steal, kill and destroy. He as ‘Time’ goes. Was created before ‘Time.’ With The Creation of The Universe Lucifer was the head of the choir that sang praises of God.


All the earth worships you and sings praises to you; they sing praises to your name.” Selah
Psalm 66:4


To the choirmaster. A Psalm of David. The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims his handiwork.
Psalm 19:1


For his invisible attributes, namely, his eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly perceived, ever since the creation of the world, in the things that have been made. So they are without excuse.
Romans 1:20


And I heard every creature in heaven and on earth and under the earth and in the sea, and all that is in them, saying, “To him who sits on the throne and to the Lamb be blessing and honor and glory and might forever and ever!”

Revelations 5:13


“Worthy are you, our Lord and God, to receive glory and honor and power, for you created all things, and by your will they existed and were created.”
Revelations 4:11

To the choirmaster. A Psalm of David. The heavens declare the glory of God, and the sky above proclaims his handiwork. Day to day pours out speech, and night to night reveals knowledge. There is no speech, nor are there words, whose voice is not heard. Their voice goes out through all the earth, and their words to the end of the world. In them he has set a tent for the sun, which comes out like a bridegroom leaving his chamber, and, like a strong man, runs its course with joy. …
Psalm 19:1-14

https://www.openbible.info/topics/all_creation_worships_god

At Creation – The seen from the unseen, Amen
A little hard to understand!

According to the big bang theory, equal amounts of matter and antimatter were created at the birth of the universe, but precious little antimatter is to be found in the universe today. Everything we see, from our bodies to our cars to the stars in distant galaxies, is made of matter.

We may then ask “What made God?” That is easier to explain. God is NOT made! HE is Eternal.  ALL was Created by Him for Him. God is nothing but Beauty and Love. ALL was created in Love.

We consider so much essentially everything in the physical. In our physical existence, things are counted in ‘Time.’ Before there was ‘Time’ there WAS.  Was is NOT created Was is! And Was will ALWAYS be!

Our ‘understanding’ is riveted in our experiences. People in His-story have been given peaks into a ‘timeless’ existence – NO beginning, no end.

According to the big bang theory, equal amounts ofmatter and antimatter were created at the birth of the universe, but precious little antimatter is to be found in the universe today. Everything we see, from our bodies to our cars to the stars in distant galaxies, is made of matter.

https://www.bibleinfo.com/en/questions/how-old-is-god

https://oklahoman.com/article/3894138/how-can-god-have-no-beginning-and-no-end

God Created before ‘Time’ His Court. We are limited by our understanding of ‘time’. To experience God; there is the cessation of ‘Time’.

If I had a dollar for each time I heard someone use this phrase to add thousands of years to the biblical, six-day Creation, I finally might be able to purchase that newer model minivan my wife would love to have. It seems as if whenever there is a discussion of the days of Creation, someone mentions how those days may have been long periods of time. After all, the Bible does say, “With God one day is a thousand years and a thousand years is one day.” Does this phrase really support the Day-Age Theory as many suggest?

First, the Bible does not say, “With God one day is a thousand years and a thousand years is one day.” The apostle Peter actually wrote: “[B]eloved, do not forget this one thing, that with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day” (2 Peter 3:8). Peter used a figure of speech known as a simile to compare a day to a thousand years. It is not that one day is precisely equivalent to 1,000 years or vice versa. Rather, within the specific context of 2 Peter 3, one could say that they share a likeness.

What is the context of 2 Peter 3? In this passage, Peter reminded Christians that “scoffers” would arise in the last days saying, “Where is the promise of His [Jesus’] coming?” (vss. 3-4). Peter declared: “[T]he heavens and the earth…are reserved for fire until the day of judgment and perdition of ungodly men” (vs. 7). Regardless of what the scoffers alleged about the Second Coming, Peter wanted the church to know that “the Lord is not slack concerning His promise [of a return], as some count slackness, but is longsuffering toward us, not willing that any should perish but that all should come to repentance” (vs. 9). Sandwiched between these thoughts is the fact that the passing of time does not affect God’s promises, specifically the promise of His return. If Jesus promised to return 1,000 or 2,000 years ago, it is as good as if He made the promise yesterday. Indeed, “with the Lord one day is as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day.” With men, the passing of long periods of time generally affects their keeping of promises, but not with God. Time has no bearing on whether He will do what He said He would do: “a thousand years are like a day” (vs. 8, NIV).

Another point to consider is that Peter used the term “day” (Greek hemeraand the phrase “thousand years” (chilia ete). This in itself is proof that God is able to communicate to man the differencebetween one day and 1,000 years. (For similes to make sense, one first must understand the literal difference between what is being compared. If there were no difference, then it would be meaningless to use such a figure of speech.) What’s more, within Genesis chapter one God used the terms “days” (Hebrew yamimand “years” (shanim). Many rightly have questioned, “If a day in Genesis is really a thousand years (or some other long period of time), then what are the years mentioned in Genesis chapter one?” Such a definition of “days” makes a reasonable interpretation of Creation impossible. The facts are: (1) God knows the difference between a day and a thousand years; (2) Peter and Moses understood this difference; (3) their original audience comprehended the difference; and (4) any unbiased reader today can do the same.

Finally, even if 2 Peter 3:8 could be tied to the length of the Creation days (logically and biblically it cannot), adding 6,000 years to the age of the Earth would in no way appease evolutionary sympathizers. A person could add 600,000 years or 600 million years and still not come close to the alleged age of the Universe. According to evolutionary calculations, one would still be 13+ billion years away from the Big Bang and four billion years this side of the formation of Earth. Truly, even an abuse of 2 Peter 3:8 will not help Day-Age theorists.

To touch on Creation before ‘Time.’
https://www.openbible.info/topics/angels_glory

Many stand having ‘lost’.

Recovering What The Enemy Has Stolen

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Published by Fellowship of Praise

To God be The glory. Let us praise God together for His ALL in our lives, Amen.

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