The woman gave birth to a boy and named him Samson. He grew and the LORD blessed him.

Rules: Samson was to be dedicated from the womb as a Nazirite, which entailed restrictions on his diet, which the angel spelled out in detail.

Nazirite: (from Hebrew nazar, “to abstain from” or “to consecrate oneself to”), among the ancient Hebrews, a sacred person whose separation was most commonly distinguished by his uncut hair and his abstinence from wine.

The early Nazirite was a holy man whose peculiar endowment, credited to his possession of “the Spirit of the Lord,” was marked by spontaneity, ecstasy, and dynamic enthusiasm. In this respect, he had much in common with the early ecstatic prophets and with diviners, such as Balaam (Numbers 22–24), both indigenous to the Middle East. Both the Nazirite and the prophet were also close to the warrior, who was likewise in a sacred state while on duty. Samson the Nazirite was a holy warrior whose special power was most closely related to his unshorn hair. In Israel such natural powers as were represented by the growth of hair were treated as signs of the power of the God of Israel, to be used in God’s service.

The later Nazirite as described in Numbers 6 and in the Mishna was not a charismatic person. He simply retained the old requirements of long hair and abstinence from wine and was forbidden to touch a corpse. These requirements were treated as external signs of a vow.

The early Nazirite was a holy man whose peculiar endowment, credited to his possession of “the Spirit of the Lord,” was marked by spontaneity, ecstasy, and dynamic enthusiasm. In this respect, he had much in common with the early ecstatic prophets and with diviners, such as Balaam (Numbers 22–24), both indigenous to the Middle East. Both the Nazirite and the prophet were also close to the warrior, who was likewise in a sacred state while on duty. Samson the Nazirite was a holy warrior whose special power was most closely related to his unshorn hair. In Israel such natural powers as were represented by the growth of hair were treated as signs of the power of the God of Israel, to be used in God’s service.

The later Nazirite as described in Numbers 6 and in the Mishna was not a charismatic person. He simply retained the old requirements of long hair and abstinence from wine and was forbidden to touch a corpse. These requirements were treated as external signs of a vow.

So, what did Samson do wrong? Delilah was a lover of money and was paid by the Philistines to betray the source of Samsons strength…

Then Delilah said to Samson, “You have made a fool of me; you lied to me. Come now, tell me how you can be tied.” He said, “If anyone ties me securely with new ropes that have never been used, I’ll become as weak as any other man.”

Multiple times Samson was betrayed and he would rise up and defeat those who came to capture him. Delilah was a Philistine who, bribed to entrap Samson, coaxed him into revealing that the secret of his strength was his long hair, whereupon she took advantage of his confidence to betray him to his enemies. Her name has since become synonymous with a voluptuous, treacherous woman.

Samson confessed that he would lose his strength “if my head were shaved” (Judges 16:15- 17). While he slept, the faithless Delilah brought in a Philistine who cut Samson’s hair, draining his strength. Delilah then “pressed him daily with her words, and urged him, so that his soul was vexed unto death,” as the King James Version Bible puts it.

The stories of Samson have inspired numerous cultural references, serving as a symbol of brute strength, heroism, self-destruction, and romantic betrayal.

A significant lesson here is test ALL things! The promise of Romans 8:28 that God works for our good “in all things” is reassuring. It means that no matter the circumstance, there are only two qualifiers for God to be working all things together for our good.

If and when we focus on the account of Samsons life, we are led to see that ALL things work together for good in the lives of those who Love God. The story of Samson resulted in the death of thousands of Philistines. Ironically, blind, chained, and ridiculed, as he died, Samson killed more Philistines than in his entire life before, ending his life in a dramatic fashion.

We are all here for a reason.

Psalm 57:2 says, “I cry out to God Most High, to God who fulfills his purpose for me.”

The Bible is very clear as to what our purpose in life should be. Men in both the Old and New Testaments sought for and discovered life’s purpose. Solomon, the wisest man who ever lived, discovered the futility of life when it is lived only for this world. He gives these concluding remarks in the book of Ecclesiastes: “Here is the conclusion of the matter: Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole duty of man. For God will bring every deed into judgment, including every hidden thing, whether it is good or evil” (Ecclesiastes 12:13-14). Solomon says that life is all about honoring God with our thoughts and lives and thus keeping His commandments, for one day we will stand before Him in judgment. Part of our purpose in life is to fear God and obey Him.

Another part of our purpose is to see life on this earth in perspective. Unlike those whose focus is on this life, King David looked for His satisfaction in the time to come. He said, “And I—in righteousness I will see your face; when I awake, I will be satisfied with seeing your likeness” (Psalm 17:15). To David, full satisfaction would come on the day when he awoke (in the next life) both beholding God’s face (fellowship with Him) and being like Him (1 John 3:2).

In Psalm 73, Asaph talks about how he was tempted to envy the wicked who seemed to have no cares and built their fortunes upon the backs of those they took advantage of, but then he considered their ultimate end. In contrast to what they sought after, he states in verse 25 what mattered to him: “Whom have I in heaven but you? And earth has nothing I desire besides you” (verse 25). To Asaph, a relationship with God mattered above all else in life. Without that relationship, life has no real purpose.

The apostle Paul talked about all he had achieved religiously before being confronted by the risen Christ, and he concluded that all of it was like a pile of manure compared to the excellence of knowing Christ Jesus. In Philippians 3:9-10, Paul says that he wants nothing more than to know Christ and “be found in Him,” to have His righteousness and to live by faith in Him, even if it meant suffering and dying. Paul’s purpose was knowing Christ, having a righteousness obtained through faith in Him, and living in fellowship with Him, even when that brought on suffering (2 Timothy 3:12). Ultimately, he looked for the time when he would be a part of the “resurrection from the dead.”

Our purpose in life, as God originally created man, is 1) glorify God and enjoy fellowship with Him, 2) have good relationships with others, 3) work, and 4) have dominion over the earth. But with man’s fall into sin, fellowship with God is broken, relationships with others are strained, work seems to always be frustrating, and man struggles to maintain any semblance of dominion over nature. Only by restoring fellowship with God, through faith in Jesus Christ, can purpose in life be rediscovered.

The purpose of man is to glorify God and enjoy Him forever. We glorify God by fearing and obeying Him, keeping our eyes on our future home in heaven, and knowing Him intimately. We enjoy God by following His purpose for our lives, which enables us to experience true and lasting joy—the abundant life that He desires for us.

https://www.openbible.info/topics/why_am_i_here_purpose

https://www.openbible.info/topics/our_purpose

Published by Fellowship of Praise: ALL praise to God our Reason, Hallelujah!!!

To God be The glory. Let us praise God together for His ALL in our lives, Amen.

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