Have you ever been proud of yourself? Patted yourself on the back? A challenge? A Job season, but even more – you!

Have you ever been proud of yourself? Patted yourself on the back? A challenge? A Job season, but even more – you!
What do you do when proud of you? How do you “take it easy”? You know that you have proven to yourself and naysayers that you are able.
Takes us one moment to let it all sink in! What will you do? What do you do?

Just asking…

Let us move right along to our share:
“Wherefore God also hath highly exalted Christ, and given Jesus a name which is above every name!”
Philippians 2:9

Passing an exam? An A+ in the class, on the test. Not just that, test of a lifetime…a lifetime being a test of an existence!

So many times, Jesus was tempted. He slayed the Earthly self. Did He have temptations? Yes! He prayed seeking God’s face at every turn.
Anger?
Many Christian scholars have pointed to Jesus’ “cleansing of the temple” as an example of righteous anger. Below are other instances where Jesus expressed anger in word or deed.

Addressing the Pharisees
Matthew 23

“Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for you tithe mint and dill and cummin, and have neglected the weightier matters of the law, justice and mercy and faith; these you ought to have done, without neglecting the others. You blind guides, straining out a gnat and swallowing a camel! … Woe to you, scribes and Pharisees, hypocrites! for you are like whitewashed tombs, which outwardly appear beautiful, but within they are full of dead men’s bones and all uncleanness.
Healing the Man with the Withered Hand
Mark 3
Again he entered the synagogue, and a man was there who had a withered hand. And they watched him, to see whether he would heal him on the sabbath, so that they might accuse him. And he said to the man who had the withered hand, “Come here.” And he said to them, “Is it lawful on the sabbath to do good or to do harm, to save life or to kill?” But they were silent. And he looked around at them with anger, grieved at their hardness of heart, and said to the man, “Stretch out your hand.” He stretched it out, and his hand was restored. The Pharisees went out, and immediately held counsel with the Herodians against him, how to destroy him.
Rebuking Peter
Mark 3 …he began to teach them that the Son of man must suffer many things, and be rejected by the elders and the chief priests and the scribes, and be killed, and after three days rise again. And he said this plainly. And Peter took him, and began to rebuke him. But turning and seeing his disciples, he rebuked Peter, and said, “Get behind me, Satan! For you are not on the side of God, but of men.” And he called to him the multitude with his disciples, and said to them, “If any man would come after me, let him deny himself and take up his cross and follow me. For whoever would save his life will lose it; and whoever loses his life for my sake and the gospel’s will save it.
Read more at http://www.beliefnet.com/faiths/christianity/2000/05/did-jesus-get-angry.aspx#sE0f3QciOZDZYa3U.99

Jesus = God in the flesh…

God displayed anger as He was about to end life…in the flood…
Anger is not always sin. There is a type of anger of which the Bible approves, often called “righteous indignation.” God is angry (Psalm 7:11; Mark 3:5), and it is acceptable for believers to be angry (Ephesians 4:26). Two Greek words in the New Testament are translated as “anger.” One means “passion, energy” and the other means “agitated, boiling.” Biblically, anger is God-given energy intended to help us solve problems. Examples of biblical anger include David’s being upset over hearing Nathan the prophet sharing an injustice (2 Samuel 12) and Jesus’ anger over how some of the Jews had defiled worship at God’s temple in Jerusalem (John 2:13-18). Notice that neither of these examples of anger involved self-defense, but a defense of others or of a principle.
https://www.gotquestions.org/Bible-anger.html

But, as we mentioned it is an emotion that helps us deal with with tumult in our path.
The biblical account of Noah begins in Genesis 6. Approximately 1,600 years had passed since the creation of Adam and Eve (Genesis 1:26–27). As the earth’s population exploded in number, it also exploded with evil. Long forgotten was the righteous sacrifice of Abel (Genesis 4:4) as “the Lord saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every intention of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually” (Genesis 6:5). Verses 11 and 12 say, “Now the earth was corrupt in God’s sight, and the earth was filled with violence. And God saw the earth, and behold, it was corrupt, for all flesh had corrupted their way on the earth.” However, “Noah found favor in the eyes of the Lord” (verse 8).

When Jesus described the events that will surround His second coming, He said, “Just as it was in the days of Noah, so will it be in the days of the Son of Man. They were eating and drinking and marrying and being given in marriage, until the day when Noah entered the ark, and the flood came and destroyed them all” (Luke 17:26–27). Jesus was pointing out that, although the people of Noah’s day were totally depraved, they were not the least bit concerned about it. They were carrying on the events of their lives without a single thought of the judgment of God. Noah is described as “a preacher of righteousness” (2 Peter 2:5), meaning he had spent years warning his friends and neighbors what the Holy God was about to do. No one listened.

The depravity and ungodly lifestyles of the entire world at that time were enough to cause the Lord to “regret that He had made man” (Genesis 6:6). Many scholars believe that part of the need to destroy every human being except Noah and his family was the sin mentioned in Genesis 6:1–4, when “the Nephilim were on the earth in those days, and also afterward, when the sons of God came in to the daughters of men, and they bore children to them.” As evil reproduced and overtook the world, the most merciful act God could perform was to start over.

Look closely at this: we are human and have weaknesses –

The Sin of Noah

Genesis 9:18-29
“Now the sons of Noah who came out of the ark were Shem and Ham and Japheth. And Ham was the father of Canaan. These three were the sons of Noah, and from these the whole earth was populated.
Then Noah began farming and planted a vineyard. And he drank of the wine and became drunk and uncovered himself inside his tent. And Ham, the father of Canaan, saw the nakedness of his father and told his two brothers outside. But Shem and Japheth took a garment and laid it upon both their shoulders and walked backward, and covered the nakedness of their father and their faces were turned away so that they did not see their father’s nakedness.
When Noah awoke from his wine, he knew what his youngest son had done to him. So he said, ‘Cursed be Canaan, a servant of servants he shall be to his brothers’. He also said, ‘Blessed be the Lord to God of Shem, and let Canaan be his servant. May God enlarge Japheth and let him dwell in the tents of Shem and let Canaan be his servant’. Noah lived 350 years after the flood, so all the days of Noah were 950 years, and he died. So ends the story of Noah.”
With this passage the life of the humanity on the earth begins, post-flood.

As we see, there is a time when we all fall into ill. The ‘drunkeness’ was not intentional, but we see the effects. We have to be mindful lest we fall.
For I do not want you to be ignorant of the fact, brothers and sisters, that our ancestors were all under the cloud and that they all passed through the sea. They were all baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea.They all ate the same spiritual food and drank the same spiritual drink; for they drank from the spiritual rock that accompanied them, and that rock was Christ. Nevertheless, God was not pleased with most of them; their bodies were scattered in the wilderness.
Now these things occurred as examples to keep us from setting our hearts on evil things as they did. Do not be idolaters, as some of them were; as it is written: “The people sat down to eat and drink and got up to indulge in revelry.” We should not commit sexual immorality, as some of them did—and in one day twenty-three thousand of them died. We should not test Christ, as some of them did—and were killed by snakes. And do not grumble, as some of them did—and were killed by the destroying angel.
These things happened to them as examples and were written down as warnings for us, on whom the culmination of the ages has come. So, if you think you are standing firm, be careful that you don’t fall! No temptation has overtaken you except what is common to mankind. And God is faithful; he will not let you be temptedm beyond what you can bear. But when you are tempted, he will also provide a way out so that you can endure it.
1 Corinthians 19:1-13

Brethren, we should beware, we are tested. But, there is always a way out of every situation.
“If any of you lack wisdom, let him ask of God, that giveth to all men liberally, and upbraideth not; and it shall be given him.”
James 1:5 (KJV)

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